Drug Rehab and Alcohol Rehab in Cambodia

DARA Drug and Alcohol Rehab is here to help you with your addiction. You aren’t alone in your struggle with substance abuse. According to a report from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (most recent data 2008) on Cambodia (directly quoted):

  • The estimated number of drug users comprised 6,000-40,000
  • Inhalants use is most common among young people and street children in urban areas
  • The most widely spread drug in this context is the methamphetamine pill ‘yama’, which is smoked
  • Increases in the use of crystal meth (‘ice’) and heroin point out to an increasing number of IDUs
  • Unofficial estimates: ATS-users [amphetamine-type stimulant]: 10,000-75,000; Heroin-users: 1,000-10,000 (UNAIDS, 2005)
  • NCHADS’ estimation for 2007 and 2008: 13,000 DUs and 2,000 IDUs

Don’t be a statistic. DARA provides premier, resort-like drug rehab and alcohol rehab in two extraordinary facilities. Our completion rates are 90%, and we use the best evidence-based practices available.

Why Seeking Alcohol and Drug Rehab in Cambodia May Not Be the Best Option for You

The above cited report also states (directly quoted):

Treatment for illicit drug users includes the following measures:

  • Using evidence-based treatment for DUs as a strategy for prevention
  • 14 state-run drug treatment and rehabilitation centers and 4 NGO centers exist nationwide
  • State-run centers have the capacity for 100-200 clients

While Cambodia and the United Nations are (or have) collaborated on community-based drug addiction treatment, unfortunately, regarding “treatment,” something else is going on—and it’s not good. According to one article published by The Nation entitled, “Cambodia’s Drug Treatment Centers: Abusive, Illegal, Ineffective”:

“Cambodians who have spent time in the country’s drug detention centers described these outrageous abuses and horrible conditions, and more…. ‘treatment’ in these facilities consists of military drills, hard labor and forced exercise. Detainees are forced to work and exercise to the point of collapse, even when they are sick and malnourished. These centres offer no medically appropriate treatment such as cognitive behavioral therapy, psycho-social support (counseling, for example) or opiate substitution therapy. As one former detainee explained, his center was “not a rehab center but a torture center.”

It’s not clear when looking at The Nation’s article if these ‘treatment’ centers are one-in-the same as the, “14 state-run drug treatment and rehabilitation centers and 4 NGO centers exist nationwide” mentioned in the report from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. What is absolutely apparent, if there are any legitimate and helpful places for drug and alcohol rehab in Cambodia, you can rest assured they would be extremely limited in quantity and most likely any quality (given the atmosphere for ‘treating’ addicts as described in the Nation’s article).

According to the article in The Nation, the organization Human Rights Watch got involved in late 2009, writing a six-page letter to the chairman of the National Authority for Combating Drugs, inquiring into the situation. The Nation also got involved in 2010 requesting official meetings to discuss findings from a year-long investigation the publication undertook. According to The Nation, “[They] got no response.” The add, the government has only responded to questions through the press: “[the government] sometimes declined comment, sometimes evaded direct response, or attacked the organization instead of addressing the facts. But the government also acknowledged certain abuses and revealed a perspective on drug dependence deeply out of touch with scientific evidence.”

Cambodia is not a place for alcohol or drug rehab. (We can only hope for a better future for Cambodia regarding addiction treatment, when perhaps one day the government comes around to the 21st century and provides caring, professional, and evidence-based treatment centers for Cambodians and expats alike.)

DARA Drug & Alcohol Rehab

Fortunately, at least for expats in Cambodia who speak English (and for Cambodians who speak English well)—and who have the resources—help is available a short distance away with us—DARA Drug & Alcohol Rehab. We’re expats ourselves, who have helped people from all over the world overcome abuse of, and addiction to, alcohol and drugs. DARA is affordable for the average American consumer. We encourage you to evaluate our rates and services, and compare them to other drug and alcohol rehab facilities internationally. We know you’ll be impressed!

When coming to Thailand for treatment at DARA Drug & Alcohol Rehab, most of our clients fly into Bangkok’s international Suvarnabhumi (pronounced “su-wan-na-poom”) Airport (BKK). Flight time of non-stop flights from Cambodia to Bangkok are just over 1 hour.

Explore our website for more information about DARA Drug & Alcohol Rehab, including information about why DARA should be your international destination for alcohol and drug rehab and recovery; then, give us a call at +66 87 140 7788, use the contact form.

Learn more about DARA’s world-class drug and alcohol treatment. Contact one of our therapists today.
+66 87 140 7788